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Uzma Ahmed, the Indian lady who affirmed she was forced to wed a Pakistani man at gunpoint, illustrated her difficulty in Pakistan.

“It’s easy to enter Pakistan. Be that as it may, it’s nearly impossible to leave . Pakistan is a death trap. I’ve seen ladies who go there after arranged marriages. They’re hopeless and living in terrible conditions. There’re two, three, even four spouses in each house,” an obviously enthusiastic Uzma said at a question and answer session on Thursday.

Uzma, who come back to India before in the day in the wake of intersection the Wagah border close Amritsar, uncovered there were numerous ladies like her still caught in the town of Buner, Pakistan.

“On the off chance that I’d stayed here for a couple days more, I would have passed on. They draw ladies from east Asian nations like Phillipines, Malaysia… there’re numerous ladies like despite everything me caught there,” she asserted.

Uzma was likewise bountiful in offering her thanks to the Indian government for protecting her.

I’m grateful to the Indian High Commission and EAM Sushma Swaraj, who gave me trust and motivation to live. They made me understand that my life was important, it was not purposeless. So I contended energetically against my conditions there,” she said.

Foreign minister Sushma Swaraj, who has called Uzma ”India’s daughter”, likewise said thanks to the Pakistani foundation and judiciary for helping Uzma return to India for compassionate grounds.

“Uzma is here a direct result of the collaboration of Pakistan’s foreign and home ministries. I thank legal advisor Shahnawaz Noon, who battled her case like a father,” Swaraj said at the question and answer session.

Uzma, who is in her early 20s and has a place with New Delhi, is accepted to have met and fallen in love with Tahir Ali in Malaysia.

She told the Islamabad High Court that Ali forced her into wedding him in Pakistan on May 3, when she was going by that nation.

She appealed to the court on May 12, asking for it to enable her to return home urgently as her girl from her first marriage in India experienced thalassaemia – a blood disorder portrayed by anomalous hemoglobin production.The court requested Ali to return her immigration papers which she said had been taken way from her. Ali presented the records, empowering her to leave Pakistan

Joined by Indian mission authorities and escorted by Pakistani police staff, she crossed into India through the Wagah Border and touched the soil of her country after she entered Indian region.

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